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View from the cupola of the Upright home on the corner of State and Hurlbut Streets, looking slightly northeast, 1890. Antrim Street is on the left. This area became the site of the Elston Hotel, later Hallett's Inn and Lakeview Inn, then Oleson's shopping plaza. The Chicago Club appears at the far side of Round Lake. The turreted house at right is the L. E. Allen residence at Bridge Street and Hurlbut, later the residence of Dr. Robert B. Armstrong. The building in front of the windmill at center was Ackert's roller rink, later Tillotson's livery barn, and later the Veterans Memorial Park. ...

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Members of Company K, 1st Regiment Michigan Sharpshooters resting under a tree in 1864. Company K was comprised of 139 enlisted Anishnaabe men and one officer from the lower and upper peninsulas. Anishanaabe men attempted to muster at the beginning of the Civil War, but were denied. It wasn't until 1863 with the Union suffering mounting loses, that they allowed native peoples to enter the forces. (Photo from the Michigan History Center)

Some of the men from Charlevoix who were members of Company K. Include Benjamin and Jacob Greensky (sons of Peter Greensky who started Greensky Methodist Church) and George Aish-ke-bug (or Ashkebug). Jacob Greensky survived the war and returned to Charlevoix where he started a family. George Ashkebug was wounded by shell fragments above his left eye and in his groin at Spotsylvania on May 25, 1864. He was in the hospital for nearly 10 months, but recovered and later returned to Charlevoix and started a family. Benjamin Greensky was KIA at Spotsylvania on May 12, 1864, and was buried on the battlefield. He was around 24 or 25 years old. If you'd like to learn more about Company K, check out the book "Deadly Aim: The Civil War Story of Michigan's Anishinaabe Sharpshooters" by Sally M. Walker. #NativeAmericanHeritageMonth
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Have a safe and happy Thanksgiving everyone. 🦃

Cornelius Geiken carving a turkey, Thanksgiving 1956. 🍗🍗
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If you are looking to do some holiday shopping this weekend, check out our online gift shop chxhistory.com/shop/ We have some items on sale! ...

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The story of the Council Trees at Greensky Hill as told by Susan Ahgosa to the Charlevoix Courier in April 1949.

Photo: Council Tree Ring, circa 1950s
Photo: Greensky Hill Methodist Church, circa 1890s
#NativeAmericanHeritageMonth
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